Caliphate

Why did the Abbasid Caliphate Collapse? Al Muqaddimah Channel : youtube.com/channel/UCf0O2efB4K66UUaT7QJPVNA Check this Instagram ...

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Caliphate Reviews

The Red Tea Detox
Mindy in Phoenix
Mindy in Phoenix
3 star

This is a podcast I didn’t want to end… I just want more more more! It’s hard to find a podcast that will beat this one or can keep my interest the way this one did.

Chris-132
Chris-132
5 star

This podcast was both entertaining and very informative.

karajobmann
Karajobmann
5 star

This podcast is a gorgeous example of journalism. Rukmini Kalamaki, thank you for your work.

Ratethispunk89
Ratethispunk89
5 star

This podcast is the detailed account of an ex-isis police officer. Highly recommend

skirlaw
Skirlaw
5 star

Riveting - and sobering -stuff- one of the best podcast series I have ever listened to. Cheesy sound effects could have been dispensed with. They are unnecessary, especially with a narrative such as this.

bc2125
Bc2125
5 star

Incredibly engaging and thought provoking.

KatDav12345
KatDav12345
5 star

Very impressed! Great reporting and intriguing stories.

thewayitwaz
Thewayitwaz
5 star

I absolutely loved this podcast. It was well put together but beyond that so just interesting, intense, raw and really gave you so much more of the picture.

great_taste_in_podcasts
Great_taste_in_podcasts
5 star

why can't there be more podcasts like this!?

AnnaBerryGood
AnnaBerryGood
5 star

A skilful reminder that most boys and now girls go to war not because they are born evil killers but because they want to belong. Gripping!!!

Snozwagon
Snozwagon
5 star

Gripping storytelling. Compelling to the last episode. Meticulous reporting. Congrats to the the team who put this together and thank you for providing an insight into ISIS and what motivates extremism.

Lauz_85
Lauz_85
5 star

For someone who doesn’t know a whole lot about these kind of stories it was very eye opening so thank you! Very interesting getting an insight into a different world

Chuck Norris
Chuck Norris

Google uses Chuck Norris as a search engine.

aCupOfLee
ACupOfLee
5 star

The most gripping podcast I’ve listened to yet, with obvious dedication to reporting and production and a story woven hauntingly throughout that left me both informed and questioning further, the world we inhabit!

Nzjemnz
Nzjemnz
5 star

A moving, real account that will grab your attention, open your eyes and make you think.

Alveew
Alveew
5 star

Excellent in depth and compelling storytelling that delves in behind the headlines

CeriBeriBoo
CeriBeriBoo
5 star

I felt like this is a podcast of two halves. At first when the second half (as it is in my mind) started I was concerned the podcast had lost its way slight. However that was because I misunderstood, this podcast isn’t about the ‘source’ it’s about ISIS, he just gives an insight in to a particular part of them, i.e. recruitment. Prisoners Part Two was hard to listen to. I was in tears by the end of the episode. This is an incredibly well done series. The knowledge and experience those involved have is staggering. They give such an in-depth account of ISIS here. It’s equally interesting and horrifying. GB

Yve-May
Yve-May
5 star

OMG this podcast series has been mesmerising, I couldn't put my headset down. Rukmini is a master, I am new to podcasts and picked this randomly. It was balanced, considerate and sensitive. This is as good as it get's surely. GB

Ryan Hoyle
Ryan Hoyle
5 star

Horrifying and compelling. Fascinating stories and journalism. The world has failed some of these victims. GB

Antoine de Saint Exupery
Antoine de Saint Exupery

I know but one freedom and that is the freedom of the mind.

Caliphate Wiki

2 Week Diet

A caliphate (Arabic: خِلافة‎ khilāfah) is an Islamic state under the leadership of an Islamic steward with the title of caliph (; Arabic: خَليفة‎ khalīfah, pronunciation ), a person considered a religious successor to the Islamic prophet Muhammad and a leader of the entire ummah (community). Historically, the caliphates were polities based in Islam which developed into multi-ethnic trans-national empires. During the medieval period, three major caliphates succeeded each other: the Rashidun Caliphate (632–661), the Umayyad Caliphate (661–750) and the Abbasid Caliphate (750–1258). In the fourth major caliphate, the Ottoman Caliphate, the rulers of the Ottoman Empire claimed caliphal authority from 1517. During the history of Islam, a few other Muslim states, almost all hereditary monarchies, have claimed to be caliphates.Prior to the rise of Muhammad and the unification of the tribes of Arabia under Islam, Arabs followed a pre-Islamic Arab polytheism, lived as self-governing sedentary and nomadic communities, and often raided their neighbouring tribes. Following the early Muslim conquests of the Arabian Peninsula, the region became unified and most of the tribes adopted Islam.The first caliphate, the Rashidun Caliphate, was established immediately after Muhammad's death in 632. The four Rashidun caliphs, who directly succeeded Muhammad as leaders of the Muslim community, were chosen through shura, a process of community consultation that some consider to be an early form of Islamic democracy. The fourth caliph, Ali, who, unlike the prior three, was from the same clan as Muhammad (Banu Hashim), is considered by Shia Muslims to be the first rightful caliph and Imam after Muhammad. Ali reigned during the First Fitna (656–661), a civil war between supporters of Ali and supporters of the assassinated previous caliph, Uthman, from Banu Umayya, as well as rebels in Egypt; the war led to the establishment of the Umayyad Caliphate under Muawiyah I in 661. The second caliphate, the Umayyad Caliphate, was ruled by Banu Umayya, a Meccan clan descended from Umayya ibn Abd Shams. The caliphate continued the Arab conquests, incorporating the Caucasus, Transoxiana, Sindh, the Maghreb and the Iberian Peninsula (Al-Andalus) into the Muslim world. The caliphate had considerable acceptance of the Christians within its territory, necessitated by their large numbers, especially in the region of Syria. Following the Abbasid Revolution from 746–750, which primarily arose from non-Arab Muslim disenfranchisement, the Abbasid Caliphate was established in 750. The third caliphate, the Abbasid Caliphate was ruled by the Abbasids, a dynasty of Meccan origin which descended from Hashim, a great-grandfather of Muhammad, making them part of Banu Hashim, via Abbas, an uncle of Muhammad, hence the name. Caliph al-Mansur founded its second capital of Baghdad in 762 which became a major scientific, cultural and art centre, as did the territory as a whole during a period known as the Islamic Golden Age. From the 10th century, Abbasid rule became confined to an area around Baghdad. From 945 to 1157, the Abbasid Caliphate came under Buyid and then Seljuq military control. In 1250, a non-Arab army created by the Abbasids called the Mamluks came to power in Egypt. In 1258, the Mongol Empire sacked Baghdad, ending the Abbasid Caliphate, and in 1261 the Mamluks in Egypt re-established the Abbasid Caliphate in Cairo. Though lacking in political power, the Abbasid dynasty continued to claim authority in religious matters until the Ottoman conquest of Mamluk Egypt in 1517.The fourth major caliphate, the Ottoman Caliphate, was established after their conquest of Mamluk Egypt in 1517. The conquest gave the Ottomans control over the holy cities of Mecca and Medina, previously controlled by the Mamluks. The Ottomans gradually came to be viewed as the de facto leaders and representatives of the Muslim world. Following their defeat in World War I, their empire was partitioned by the United Kingdom and French Third Republic, and on 3 March 1924, the first President of the Turkish Republic, Mustafa Kemal Atatürk, as part of his reforms, constitutionally abolished the institution of the caliphate. A few other states that existed through history have called themselves caliphates, including the Isma'ili Fatimid Caliphate in Northeast Africa (909–1171), the Umayyad Caliphate of Córdoba in Iberia (929–1031), the Berber Almohad Caliphate in Morocco (1121–1269) and the Fula Sokoto Caliphate in present-day northern Nigeria (1804–1903). The Sunni branch of Islam stipulates that, as a head of state, a caliph may come to power in one of four ways: either through an election, through nomination, through a selection by a committee, or by force. Followers of Shia Islam, however, believe a caliph should be an Imam chosen by God from the Ahl al-Bayt (the "Family of the House", referring to Muhammad's family). In the early 21st century, following the failure of the Arab Spring and defeat of the self-proclaimed "Islamic State", there has seen "a broad mainstream embrace of a collective Muslim identity" by young Muslims and the appeal of a caliphate as a "idealized future Muslim state" has grown ever stronger.. Why did the Abbasid Caliphate Collapse?, The Collapse of the Abbasids, The fall of the Abbasid, Why did the arab empire collapse, Fall of arabs, fall of the arab empire, Why did the arab empire fall, The collapse of the Umayyad Caliphate, Why did the Abbasid Empire Collapse, Why did the Umayyad Empire collapse, Why did the Fatimid Empire collapse, Wny did the Rashidun Empire collapse, Why did the Arab Caliphate Collapse, Why did the Arab empire fall, Al Muqaddimah, Knowledgia,

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Caliphate Podcast News

  • Explosion in Syria Kills Driver for NBC News Team - The blast occurred hours after a U.S.-backed militia announced that the Islamic State had been routed from its last patch of Syrian territory.
  • The West Doesn’t Want ISIS Members to Return. Why Should the Syrians Put Up With Them? - British and American governments must take responsibility for their citizens who joined the Islamic State. A decision about their future should be made by the penal systems of their countries.
  • Last ISIS Village in Syria Falls, and a Caliphate Crumbles - American-backed forces took the last remnant of territory under Islamic State rule in Syria, but signs of the group’s resurgence are already visible.
  • Its Territory May Be Gone, but the U.S. Fight Against ISIS Is Far From Over - Thousands of Islamic State fighters are still at large in Iraq and Syria, rearming and regrouping. And the group pose threats elsewhere, in Afghanistan, West Africa and the Philippines.

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Podcast Data

  • Relase Date21 June 2018
  • CategoryNews & Politics
  • ArtistThe New York Times
  • Track12

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